Volume 8, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 1-5
Magnitude and Associated Factors of Postoperative Myalgia Among Patients Who Undergo Surgery in Wolaita Sodo Teaching and Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia
Bulcha Guye Adema, Department Pediatrics and Neonatal Nursing, College of Health Science, Woliata Sodo University, Woliata, Ethiopia
Mohammed Sulieman Obsa, Department Anesthesia, College of Health Science, Woliata Sodo University, Woliata, Ethiopia
Mihret Zerifu, Department Anesthesia, College of Health Science, Woliata Sodo University, Woliata, Ethiopia
Dirba Bekele, Department Anesthesia, College of Health Science, Woliata Sodo University, Woliata, Ethiopia
Desta Yacob, Department Anesthesia, College of Health Science, Woliata Sodo University, Woliata, Ethiopia
Received: Feb. 29, 2020;       Accepted: Mar. 18, 2020;       Published: Apr. 14, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijbse.20200801.11      View  91      Downloads  33
Abstract
Introduction: Even though, Suxamethonium is the only short acting and accepted standard for rapid sequence intubation, it is associated with a high risk of complications. Some complications are minor, but others are potentially life threatening. Post-operative myalgia and fasciculation are the two most common and distressing side effects of succinylcholine administration. Objective: To assess the magnitude and associated factors of postoperative myalgia following Suxamethonium administration among patients undergoing surgery in Wolaita Sodo Teaching and Referral Hospital from April 30- May 30, 2019. Methods: Facility based cross sectional survey will be conducted by using convenient sampling technique. Training was given for data collectors and supervisors. Regular supervision and follow up were made. Data was entered in to Epi info version 7 software and transported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Odd ratio and 95% confidence interval was computed. Bivariate and Multivariate analysis used to identify factors associated with hypotension. Results: The magnitude of postoperative myalgia is high at 12 hour in which 18 (36%) develop mild pain where us the magnitude is lower at 24 hour, 14 (28%). More than half 27 (54%) have no postoperative myalgia at 12 hour. Patients who did not take pretreatment agent before administration of Suxamethonium were 15 times more likely to develop post-operative myalgia at 12 hour when compared to patients who take pretreatment agent before Suxamethonium administration (AOR=15.12, 95%CI: 1.39, 163.53) Conclusion: The magnitude of Suxamethonium induced myalgia is higher at 12 hour than 24 hour post operative and lack of per-treatment agent and repeated dose of Suxamethonium are main risk factors of postoperative myalgia.
Keywords
Suxamethonium, Postoperative Myalgia, Magnitude
To cite this article
Bulcha Guye Adema, Mohammed Sulieman Obsa, Mihret Zerifu, Dirba Bekele, Desta Yacob, Magnitude and Associated Factors of Postoperative Myalgia Among Patients Who Undergo Surgery in Wolaita Sodo Teaching and Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia, International Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering. Vol. 8, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbse.20200801.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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